Thursday, January 16, 2014

Those Places Thursday - Coffeyville, Kansas

The first place I associated with the Deller family was Coffeyville, Kansas.  We didn't have a lot of information, but what we did know was that Charles Joseph Deller had grown up there.

As I searched online, I found that Coffeyville was located in the southeast corner of Kansas, in Montgomery County.  It was established in 1869, originally as an Indian Trading post by Col. James A. Coffey.  In 1871 the railroad came through and the city was laid out and incorporated in 1873.

In October 1892, in what might be the cities most famous incident, the Dalton gang tried to rob two banks at one time.  The plan didn't work, and four of the gang were killed, with only Emmett Dalton surviving (with 23 bullet wounds).  Four citizens of Coffeyville, including a U.S. Marshall were killed in defending the city.[1][2]  There is a Dalton Museum now, and every October they celebrate "Dalton Defender Days", a  remembrance of those who lost their lives defending the city.[3]
Dalton Museum, Coffeyville, Kansas,
Digital Image February 2010, A.B. Deller © 2014

Coffeyville had many natural resources, including natural gas, and by the early 1900's there were ten glass factories in operation as well as brick companies.[4]

These prospects for jobs were probably what brought Peter Deller and his family (including Charles Joseph) to Coffeyville from McKean County, Pennsylvania.  His brother, Nickolas "Nick" Deller was already there by 1910.[5] 

They attended the local Catholic church, and may have even helped in it's building, since it wasn't completed until 1916.[6][7]
Holy Name Catholic Church, Coffeyville, Kansas,
Digital Image February 2010, A.B. Deller © 2014

Peter and his family initially rented a house on Delaware Street[8], but by 1930 owned that same house[9].

Coffeyville was a good place for the Deller family.  Both Peter and Carrie raised their children and lived out the rest of their lives there.

[1] Coffeyville, Kansas, Wikipedia, [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffeyville,_Kansas], accessed 23 Feb 2011.
[2] Coffeyville History, Coffeyville Kansas website, [http://www.coffeyville.com/History.htm], accessed 23 Feb 2011.
[3]  Dalton Defenders, Coffeyville Chamber of Commerce website,[http://www.coffeyvillechamber.org/Dalton-Defenders-35840.asp], accessed 23 Feb 2011.
[4] Brick and Glass, Coffeyville Chamber of Commerce website, [http://www.coffeyvillechamber.org/Brick-and-Glass-35900.asp], accessed 23 Feb 2011.
[5]  FamilySearch.org, 1910 United States Federal Census, Year: 1910; Census Place: Coffeyville Ward 2, Montgomery, Kansas; family 1, page 1.  Accessed 23 Feb 2011.
[6] Parish Records, Holy Name Catholic Church, Coffeyville, Kansas
[7] History, Holy Name Catholic Church website, [http://www.holynamecoffeyville.org/History.html]. Accessed 23 Feb 2011.
[8] Ancestry.com, 1920 United States Federal Census, Year: 1920; Census Place: Coffeyville Ward 5, Montgomery, Kansas; Roll: T625_541; Page: 16A; Enumeration District: 180; Image: 1088.
[9] Ancestry.com, 1930 United States Federal Census, Year: 1930; Census Place: Coffeyville, Montgomery, Kansas; Roll: 712; Page: 8B; Enumeration District: 22; Image: 546.0.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

52 Week Challenge: 2 - Mable Allie Roark

I read about Amy Johnson's 52 Week Challenge at Ancestry.com and at her blog site. She said, "My goals with No Story Too Small have been to remind myself that it's alright to blog about just a portion of someone's life..."  I have been trying to start writing a family history, but I've gotten easily overwhelmed and discouraged wondering when and where to start.  So, while the research will never really be complete, this has encouraged me to start writing about what we have found.

2 - Mable Allie Roark
Mable Allie Roark was born 10 February 1906 in Galena, Kansas to George T. Roark and Elnora Hussong, where George was working as a miner.[1]   By March 1907, her brother Roy had joined the family,[2]  and in the 1910 Federal Census, Mable and Roy were living with their parents in Webb City, along with their Uncle Tunny and Aunt Minnie Roark.  Webb City was then a suburb of Joplin, Missouri, surrounded by mines, and both Mable's father and her uncle worked in those mines; George as a powder-man and Tunny as a Machine-man.[3, 4]

On  27 February 1914, Mable's father, George Thomas Roark died from Pulmonary Tuberculosis attributed to working in the mines.[5]  It was probably difficult for a young widow with two young children, but Mable's mother was a hard working woman; we know that later in life she took in laundry and grew a garden to make ends meet. Her family and Tunny and other members of the Roark family may have helped her as well.  There was also a suggestion that the mining companies paid some type of benefit to the deceased miner's family, and if that was the case, I'm sure it would have been very welcome.


Four years later, on 8 March 1918, Mable's mother, Elnora, married William "Bill" Franklin Asbell in Joplin, Missouri.[6]  They continued living in the Joplin area, at least until 9 February 1919, when Mable's little brother, Roy, died from pneumonia.[7]  He was buried next to his father in an unmarked grave at Fairview Cemetery in Joplin.

By January 1920, Mable was 13 years old and the new Asbell family was living in Coffeyville, Kansas, on Dakota Street; just one street away from the Deller family.[8]  In June she welcomed a little brother, William Franklin Asbell, Jr.[9] Then four years later, on 16 February 1924, right after she'd turned 18, she married Charles Joseph Deller.[10] 



 
In 1924, Nora and Bill Asbell, along with some others, made a trip to California. It is thought that they went in search of jobs.  They camped out along the way and took various photos.  There is one that seems to show Charles and Mable on the first night they made camp. We don't have any hard evidence for this trip, other than family stories and a few photos, but it certainly brings history a little closer to home.

In January of 1925, the young family was living in Picher, Oklahoma, and Mable had her first child, Charles Joseph Deller Jr.[11]  Mable had, what was then called, a nervous breakdown after little Charles was born, and her mother, Nora, took care of her and the baby at home.[12]  By 1930 Charles, Mable and little Charles were living in a rented house on Maple Street in Coffeyville, Kansas.[13]

Mable's illness and an auto accident probably added stress to this young marriage, and it couldn't withstand it.  We don't have records for a divorce, but believe they obtained one in 1931 before Mable remarried. She later moved to Tulsa and began working in a drug store. On her lunch hour one day, she walked to a department store to pay on a lay-a-way, and Rudy (Adolfo R. Valdez) saw her. He followed her back to the drug store and asked the proprietor to introduce them.  On 10 June 1932 in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma the two were married.[14, 15] 

This happened during the Depression.  Their oldest daughter remembers, "...there were no jobs, they moved in with his family for awhile. One of the stories goes that Dad would get up early, in time for the milk man to deliver other peoples milk and he would go up to the porches and steal the milk so I would have milk to drink. Another story was he would have a cup of coffee for breakfast, then walk approximately 10 miles , work all day for the WPA and then walk back home. I think their supper was a bowl of beans. They had a very hard time of it, I think that is why Charles [Mable's son] lived with his grandmother, as she had pigs, chickens and a vegetable garden, so they always had plenty of food.[16]

In November 1933, Mable and Rudy had their first little girl and in March of 1935, they had a second daughter.[17]

In 1939 young Charles had moved to live with his mother and step-father in Dallas, when he received a letter from his father.[18]  Four days later, Charles Joseph Deller, Mable's first husband, died from an accidental drowning. Their son attended the funeral with his grandmother Nora.[19]

Mable, Rudy and the two girls traveled all over the south, as Rudy worked different construction jobs.  I've not been able to find the family in the U.S. 1940 Federal Census, probably because of this. Their oldest daughter shared, "[We] were always the new kids in class. One year we attended seven different grade schools. It was terribly hard to keep good grades.  Mother was a good trouper, she never complained about all the traveling but when I was starting high school, she put her foot down and said the gypsy days were over. They bought a duplex in Dallas and settled down. If he [Rudy] had work out of town, he went alone."  This would probably have been after World War II, between 1947 and 1949, when their oldest daughter was about 15 years old.[20]

On 2 December 1950, Mable attended the wedding of her son Charles, to Carolyn Jones in San Antonio, Texas,[21] and in 1953 and 1955 she attended the weddings of her daughters.[22]

During the 50's and 60's, family photos show that Mable and Rudy visited her son Charles and his family in Owasso and Tulsa, Oklahoma, her daughters and family and also her mother Nora, who was then living with her son Bill Asbell Jr.[23]

There are family pictures of Mable and Rudy in various places, indicating that they traveled a bit after the children were married.  Mable's mother Nora came to live with them in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and later moved with them to Dallas, Texas.   Nora died 26 March 1965 of cancer. [24, 25]


On 15 June 1979, Rudy died in Dallas, Texas.  After his death, Mable lived with her oldest daughter until her death on 17 December 1988.  She is buried at Laural Lane Cemetery in Dallas, Texas, next to her husband, Rudy Valdez.[26, 27]

At some time, Mable changed her name, from Mable Allie to Mable Alice. Her oldest daughter said that she never knew where "Allie" had come from, and hated it.[28]  And, from all the descriptions that I've heard, that sounds just like something that Mable would do. She was an independent, opinionated and sometimes a coarse woman, but she loved her family and grandchildren, and they meant the world to her.[29, 30]
[1] ROARK, F, first child, Cherokee County Birth Records 1903-1911 birth certificate (1906).
[2] Ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census, Year: 1910; Census Place: Webb Ward 2, Jasper, Missouri; Roll: T624_791; Page: 14B; Enumeration District: 61; Image: 852.
[3] Ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census, Year: 1910; Census Place: Webb Ward 2, Jasper, Missouri; Roll: T624_791; Page: 14B; Enumeration District: 61; Image: 852.
[4] "Mining Artifacts & History." Article. Mining Artifacts. http://www.miningartifacts.org : 2014.
[5] George T Roark, death certificate no. Registration District No. 411, File No. 5118, Primary Reg Dist No 2002, Registered No. 75 (1914), Missouri State Board of Health Bureau of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death, St Louis, MO.
[6] Marriage Certificate for William F Asbell & Norah Roark.
[7] Ancestry.com, Missouri Death Records, 1834-1931, Death Certificate - Roy Roark.
[8] Ancestry.com, 1920 United States Federal Census, Year: 1920; Census Place: Coffeyville Ward 5, Montgomery, Kansas; Roll: T625_541; Page: 14B; Enumeration District: 180; Image: 1085.
[9] Ancestry.com, Social Security Death Index, Number: 446-10-1910; Issue State: Oklahoma; Issue Date: Before 1951.
[10] Montgomery Kansas, Marriage License, 11464, 16 February 1924.
[11] Charles J. Deller Jr., birth certificate no. Reg. Dist. 58254, Primary Dist No. 8315, Reg. No. 89 (1925), Oklahoma State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Oklahoma City, Okla.
[12] E.D. Valdez, "nora=mable=deller," email to A.B. Deller, 3 May 2013.
[13] Ancestry.com, 1930 United States Federal Census, Year: 1930; Census Place: Coffeyville, Montgomery, Kansas; Roll: 712; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 22; Image: 553.0.
[14] Society, Oklahoma Historical. "Marriage Records." Database. Research Center. www.okhistory.org/research: 2014.
[15] E.D. Valdez, "Mable-Deller ltr," email to A.B. Deller, 17 October 2009.
[16] Valdez, "Mable-Deller ltr," email to A.B. Deller, 17 October 2009.
[17] Personal knowledge of the author, E. D. Valdez.
[18] Letter from Charles Joseph Deller to Charles Franklin Deller, 11 Jul 1939.
[19] Charles J. Deller, notice, unidentified clipping, Newspaper Clipping - Funeral Service for Charles Joseph Deller.
[20] E.D. Valdez, "Mable-Deller ltr," email to A.B. Deller, 17 October 2009.
[21] Charles F. Deller and Carolyn Jones Wedding, Reception, digital image.
[22] Personal knowledge of the author, E. D. Valdez.
[23] Multiple photos of Mable & Rudy Valdez with Deller and childrens families, digital images.
[24] E.D. Valdez, "nora=mable=deller," email to A.B. Deller, 3 May 2013.
[25] Nora Asbell, Dallas, Dallas Texas death certificate 14242 (1965).
[26] Ancestry.com, Social Security Death Index, Number: 457-16-6260; Issue State: Texas; Issue Date: Before 1951.
[27] Gravestone for Mable A. Valdez, 1909 - 1988, Laural Land Cemetery, Dallas, Texas.
[28] E.D. Valdez, telephone interview, 16 April 2010.
[29] E.D. Valdez, "Mable-Deller ltr," email to A.B. Deller, 17 October 2009.
[30] D.C. Deller, interview, 14 January 2014.



Other posts about Mable Roark:
Wordless Wednesday - Roy & Mable Roark
10 February - Happy Birthday Granny Mable!
Happy Birthday George T. Roark
Share Your Memories
Tombstone Tuesday - George Roark
Tombstone Tuesday - Mable Alice Roark Deller Valdez
Wordless Wednesday - Roy & Mable Roark, 1910

Wordless Wednesday - Roy and Mable Roark


Sunday, January 12, 2014

52 Week Challenge: 1 - Charles Joseph Deller

I read about Amy Johnson's 52 Week Challenge at Ancestry.com and at her blog site. She said, "My goals with No Story Too Small have been to remind myself that it's alright to blog about just a portion of someone's life..."  I have been trying to start writing a family history, but I've gotten easily overwhelmed and discouraged wondering when and where to start.  So, while the research will never really be complete, this has encouraged me to start writing about what we have found.

1 - Charles Joseph Deller

Charles Joseph Deller, or Charlie, was born in Kane, McKean County, Pennsylvania on 21 July 1905 to Peter and Carrie Deller.[1]  His family had  moved there from Norristown, Pennsylvania after 1900,[2]  possibly following his uncle Charles Deller, who had moved to Kane with his family before 1900 along with his Uncle Nicholas and new wife.[3]  In 1910 his family lived in Wetmore, a little village outside of Kane, and had grown by two, twins, Joseph and Josephine.[4]  In 1911 Peter and Carrie moved their family to Coffeyville, Kansas.[14]

In 1920 at the time of the census, he was 14 years old and living with his parents in Coffeyville.[5]  Sometime between 1918 and 1920 a new family moved to their neighborhood, Bill and Nora Asbell, with their daughter, Mable, who was only a year younger than he was.[6,7]  Mable probably went to school with and was friends with the Charlie's sisters (Margerite and Josephine were about her age). Both Bill and Peter loved to fish, and Nora and Carrie were hard working housewives.  Families with a lot in common, just the kind of situation that would encourage two young people.  Charlie and Mable were married in Coffeyville, Kansas on 16 February 1924 with his parents permission.[8]

On 23 January 1925, little Charles Joseph Deller Jr. was born in Picher, Oklahoma,[9] where Charlie was probably already working in the local mines.  We have his workers identification card dated November 1928; he was working at the Picher 26 Mine as a machine helper.[10]  By 1930 the little family was renting a little house on Maple Street in Coffeyville, Kansas, and Charlie was working as a painter in a machine shop.[11] 


After Charlie Jr. was born, the family stories say that Mable had a nervous breakdown; and at some point she had a bad car accident. We don't have any records of this (except for a picture of the smashed up car), but whatever happened probably contributed to the breakup of their marriage. We haven't found a record of their divorce, but we do know that Mable remarried around 1931 and are assuming they divorced before then.

Charlie married Thelma (unknown last name) on 12 July 1933. The next record we find is a petition for divorce dated 7 October 1937 in the Montgomery County Court system. This document stated they had no children, no property, and that Thelma had been guilty of "gross neglect of duty and extreme cruelty."  Then, on 1 November 1937, Charles submitted an "Order of Dismissal" to stop the divorce proceedings.[12]  At the time of his death, in 1939, he was still married to Thelma.[13]

The next record we have for Charlie is a letter, dated 11 July 1939, sent to his son Charles in Dallas, Texas (who was visiting his mother and step-father). He told him that he had a night job outside the Corden Building in Tulsa, Oklahoma and would have all day to spend with him. He also told him that he had a new boat trailer and outboard motor.[13]


Four days later, 15 July 1939, Charlie died as the result of an accidental drowning.  His obituary, printed in the Coffeyville newspaper, reported that he had taken his boat to Ketchum, Oklahoma to spend the weekend fishing. "Persons on the bank said that immediately after Mr. Deller started the motorboat, it whirled around several times and he plunged into the water."[14, 15]

 He was buried on 17 July 1939 at Fairview Cemetery in Coffeyville, Kansas.[15, 16]

[1] County, MCKEAN COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA McKean County PA Early Births 1893 - 1905, Diller, not named.
[2]  Ancestry.com, 1900 United States Federal Census, Year: 1900; Census Place: Norristown, Montgomery, Pennsylvania; Roll: T623_1444; Page: 6B; Enumeration District: 245.
[3] FamilySearch.org, 1900 United States Federal Census, Year: 1900; Census Place:Kane , McKean, Pennsylvania;  Enumeration District: 0112, Sheet Number 13A, Household id: 264, GSU Film Number 1241439.
[4]  Ancestry.com, 1910 United States Federal Census, Year: 1910; Census Place: Wetmore, McKean, Pennsylvania; Roll: T624_1374; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 140; Image: 557.

[5] Ancestry.com, 1920 United States Federal Census, Year: 1920; Census Place: Coffeyville Ward 5, Montgomery, Kansas; Roll: T625_541; Page: 16A; Enumeration District: 180; Image: 1088.
[6] Marriage Certificate for William F Asbell & Norah Roark.
[7] Ancestry.com, 1920 United States Federal Census, Year: 1920; Census Place: Coffeyville Ward 5, Montgomery, Kansas; Roll: T625_541; Page: 14B; Enumeration District: 180; Image: 1085.
[8] Montgomery Kansas, Marriage License, 11464, 16 February 1924.
[9] Charles J. Deller Jr., birth certificate no. Reg. Dist. 58254, Primary Dist No. 8315, Reg. No. 89 (1925), Oklahoma State Board of Health, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Oklahoma City, Okla.
[10] U.S. Bureau of Mines ID Card for Chas. Deler.
[11] Ancestry.com, 1930 United States Federal Census, Year: 1930; Census Place: Coffeyville, Montgomery, Kansas; Roll: 712; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 22; Image: 553.0.
[12] District Court of Montgomery County Kansas, Independence, Kansas, Microfiche, C.J. Deller vs Thelma Deller.
[13] Letter from Charles Joseph Deller to Charles Franklin Deller, 11 Jul 1939.
[14] Coffeyville Daily Journal, 17 July 1939.
[15]Charles J Deller, Ketchum, Mayes, OK death certificate 12310 (15 July 1939).
[16] Gravestone for Charles Joseph Deller, 1906 - 1939, Fairview Cemetery, Coffeyville, Kansas.
 
Other blog posts about Charles Joseph Deller:
Wordless Wednesday
Wordless Wednesday - Charles Joseph Deller
Amanuensis Monday - The Last Letter from Charles Joseph Deller
Sunday's Obituary - Charles Joseph Deller
Tombstone Tuesday - Charles Joseph Deller


Saturday, March 23, 2013

Happy Birthday George T. Roark

Digital image of  (standing) Unknown boy, Elnora Hussong Roark, George Roark,
(sitting) Allie Hogan Roark holding an Unknown child.  c. 1905, probably
Lawrence County, Missouri, original photograph held by D. Bell, c.2010

George Thomas Roark was born March 23, 1881 in Barry County, Missouri to David Martin Roark and Almeda "Allie" Hogan.

In 1900 he was resident in Barry County, living with and working for a local family.  In 1904 he married Elnora Hussong, and soon had two children, Mabel Allie (Mabel changed this to Alice later) and Roy.

In 1910 their family was living together, with his brother Tunny and new bride Minnie in Webb City, Missouri, both he and Tunny working in the mines there in Jasper County, Missouri.  George stated his occupation as "Powder-man" while Tunny was a "Machine-man."







Digital image of Mabel Roark, George Roark,  and Roy Roark,
c. 1910, probably Jasper County, Missouri, original print held by D. Deller, c.2013

 
Digital image of a group of Miners, with George Roark identified. c. 1910, probably Jasper
County, Missouri, original photograph held by D. Bell, c.2010

 George died February 27, 1914; the cause of death was Pulmonary Tuberculosis, with a secondary cause listed as "working in mines."

The mines were not good to the Roark brothers.  Three of the four brothers worked in the local mines, and all three died in their 30's, of tuberculosis.








Sunday, February 10, 2013

10 February - Happy Birthday Granny Mable!

Photograph of Mable Roark Valdez & Rudy Valdez,
unknown date & location. In possession of D.C. Deller, New Bern, NC.